Hey College Grads, Analytics of Cold Calling, Biggest Deal Ever.

Matt's LinkedIn Posts May 2020

Hey, soon to be college grads.

You’ll be starting your career during one of the most challenging economic times in the history of the world.

As a result:

You’ll be smarter.
You’ll learn faster.
You’ll be more resilient.
You’ll be ready for adversity
You’ll be more understanding.
You’ll be exactly what you want to be.

Congrats on your degree, sorry it had to end this way.

Good luck conquering the world!

Why make cold calls?

Information sharing.

When it comes to the value your company provides, decision makers probably don’t have all the information.

If you can communicate what’s important on a cold call, then you can change the game.

That’s why we make cold calls.

Good luck on the phones today!

7 traits of a good listener:

-they keep their attention focused on the speaker.
-they ask confirming questions.
-they occasionally summarize key details.
-they don’t think about what they’re going to say next.
-they never interrupt.
-they’re memorable.
-they’re well liked.

Are you a good listener?

The analytics of cold calling are always relative.

It can be really effective for some companies and not at all for others.

Some key factors include the call strategy, quality of training, team skill level, value proposition and target decision maker persona.

Cold calling can work especially well if you’re selling a product or service that most decision makers don’t know about.

It can also be effective if you’re able to save your prospect money. Cost reduction is usually a great icebreaker.

No matter what you’re selling, you won’t know until you try.

Message me if you need help.

During a sales call yesterday a decision maker asked me an interesting question.

He said “nobody’s great at everything, tell me one thing you guys are really good at?”

At that point in the conversation I had no idea what he needed. Since we provide a variety of services, I didn’t want to let him pigeonhole us.

So I said, “if I had to pick one thing, I’d say we’re really good at exceeding our client’s expectations.”

He laughed.

What’s your answer to this question?

Most sales people and entrepreneurs who are missing their quota don’t target enough prospects.

They wait for inbound to create opportunities.

I’m a proponent of quality over quantity but at its core sales is a numbers game.

Only a small percentage of prospects will be receptive to your outreach or in a position to buy.

By consistently calling on enough prospects you increase the likelihood of hitting your number.

How many new prospects did you find today?

You better not say none.

The biggest deal I’ve ever sold.

I was a district sales manager for a F500 transportation company.

Six weeks after implementation the contract sparked a meeting with both CEOs and some other executives.

It was thrilling to see my deal bring together leaders from two of the largest companies in the world.

I opened up the meeting and I remember feeling nervous for a split second but it was clear sailing after that.

After laying the groundwork for a nice conversation, things almost went sideways when their CFO asked our CEO a question.

He asked, “So, where do you spend most of your time?”

Our CEO arrogantly answered, “Well, I run the whole show”.

I’ll never forget the look on their faces.

I had three big takeaways from this experience:

-When you’re in the conversation, you belong.

-The words you use are more important than your title.

-It’s hard to recover from arrogance at any level.

Being successful in sales is all about how you spend your time.

Try not to spend too much of it doing this:

-perusing worldometers
-making videos for TikTok
-playing animal crossing
-studying fantasy football
-watching Netflix
-chatting up Slack
-reading the news
-scrolling LinkedIn
-eating
-napping

I said, “too much!”.

My goal is to focus 30 min 5 off.

It ends up being more like 15 min off.

How do you avoid distractions?

There’s a lot being put into cadences and sequences in sales.

Rightfully so.

I think an important thing to accomplish with a cadence is to let the decision maker know you’re in it for the long haul.

If they feel like you’re not going away, they’re more likely to respond.

You can do this by spreading out your sales touches.

Instead of a two week cadence.

Make it eight weeks.

Better yet, six months.

Patience and persistence go a long way in sales.

Good luck!

The fastest way to become a successful sales rep for a new company;

Learn from the people who’ve mastered it.

It’s different at every company.

Many reps with previous sales experience are unwilling to learn from tenured reps.

That’s a big mistake.

The experienced reps have information that could take years for the newcomers to figure out on their own.

Just by being around these veterans, new reps will pick up on nuances of the sale.

And if they’re willing to become students, their timeline to success could be significantly shortened.

No matter how high you’ve risen in sales, when you start at a new company;

Check your pride at the door.

You’ll be back on top faster.

Here are seven ways to fail in sales:

Don’t ask questions.
Don’t prospect regularly.
Don’t listen to decision makers.
Don’t add value.
Don’t be persistent.
Don’t be curious.
Don’t be courageous.

Thanks for reading, please share!

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About the Author

Matt Wanty is the Founder of Subroot and the Author of The Lost Art of Cold Calling. Recently launched Subroot is the latest sales tool to help reps reach more prospects and build a bigger sales funnel.  In addition to writing a book on cold calling, Matt regularly shares posts on Linkedin, His sales content on cold calling, prospecting, sales career, SDRs and more has been read by millions of sales people around the world.  Sign up below to receive Matt’s content directly to your inbox.

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